MCISD candidates spend over $65,000 leading up to board elections

As election day approaches the candidates for the MCISD Board of Trustees have been spending, vying to be elected.

A total of nine candidates are running for four places on the Mission Consolidated Independent School District Board of Trustees – Place 2, Place 3, Place 4 and Place 5. $65,909.53 were reported as expenditures for eight of the nine candidates over their entire campaign.

Overall, incumbent candidate for Place 3 Jerry Zamora spent the most on his campaign. Campaign Finance Reports for candidate Roy Vela (Place 4) were not posted by press time, but he did submit an appointment for campaign treasurer Melinda Barrs.

Early voting ends today, Friday Oct. 30, 2020. Election day is set for Tues. Nov. 3, 2020.

Place 2

Candidate Nelda Iris “Coach” Igelsias submitted finance reports dating back to June 2019. Iglesias reported spending $13,236.72 on her campaign in total.

From June 10, 2019 through Dec. 31, 2019, Iglesias reported $1,400 in political contributions and $1,036.44 in total political expenses (with $307.14 from personal funds). The expenses for this period went toward banking fees, checks, deposit slips and buttons.

From Jan. 1, 2020 through June 30, 2020, Iglesias reported $300 in political contributions and $5,170.32 in political expenditures. She took out $6,500 in loans during this period.

The expenditures went toward shirts, advertising, food for a campaign event, wood for political signs, supplies, beverages, tables and chairs for a campaign kick-off event, banking service fees, printing expenses, campaign advertisements and a fundraiser event.

From July 1 through Sept. 24, Iglesias reported $3,900 in political contributions and $7,029.96 in political expenditures. She took out $2,500 in loans during this period.

The funds for this period went toward Facebook campaign advertising, political functions, sandbags for campaign signs, meetings, advertising, two phone banks, campaign signs, shirts and food for a political function.

Over the course of her campaign, Iglesias’ largest contributors were Noe Olivarez, the owner of Demo-Con (a construction company), Jose Figueroa and Gilbert Enriquez, who each donated $1,000.

Candidate Beto Garza reported spending $13,705 on his campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 1 through June 30, Garza reported $1,800 in political contributions and spent $1,715. The expenditures for this period reflect picking up fallen campaign signs, a barbecue plate donation, a family fundraiser, yard signs, photos and graphics.

From July 1 through Oct. 4, Garza reported $12,010 in political contributions and $11,990 in expenditures.

Expenses for this period went toward campaign signs, a virtual campaign party promotion and event, drive-thru meet and greet events, video advertisements and photos, sandbags and nails for campaign signs, a Master of Ceremonies and music for a campaign event, food for the events, campaign face masks, lunches for block walkers, music, drone and video footage and a DJ for a 2020 Dove Hunt event, cooks and catering for other campaign and fundraiser events, contract labor, print advertisements and grass mowing, hay, a DJ, photographer and trash cans for a campaign event at a pumpkin patch.

Over the course of his campaign, Garza’s largest contributors were Weslaco Insurance Broker Jeffery Wayne Everitt ($2,000), a land developer with SantaFe Properties Kyal Rupert ($1,500), Mateo Leal, Andres Morales and Eddie Saenz ($1,000 each).

Place 3

Incumbent Candidate Jerry Zamora submitted finance reports dating back to April 2019. Zamora reported spending $20,285.92 on his campaign in total.

From April 16, 2019 through Dec. 31, 2019, Zamora reported $12,750 in total political contributions and $10,910.03 in political expenditures. Expenses for this period went toward a fishing tournament, skeet shoots, caps, donations to the Mission Pawsible Animal Shelter, Girls 8a Softball Team, yard signs, skeet shoot supplies, backdrop and beverages, a photographer and host for the skeet shoot, sandwich buns, condolences flowers for Jerry Bell, a barbecue, school books, fan shirts and snacks for a volleyball team, a meet and greet event, a banner, a Christmas campaign party and supplies for a New Year’s Eve campaign party.

From Jan. 16, 2020 through July 15, 2020, Zamora reported $4,000 in total political contributions and $2,362.01 in expenditures. The funds went toward “Get Out the Vote” events, primary election, advertising, hammers and nails, a ballot bash, golf tournament, campaign signs and yard signs.

From July 16 through Sept. 24, Zamora reported $4,350 in political contributions and $7,013.88 in political expenditures. The expenses for this period went toward a viewing, flower spray, “Get Out the Vote” events, political signs, nails, face masks, a 2020 Dove Hunt, yard signs, drinks, caps, a caravan rally, lunches, a meet and greet event and a campaign event at a pumpkin patch.

Over the course of his campaign, Zamora’s largest contributors were Weslaco Insurance Broker Jeffery Wayne Everitt ($6,000), Alberto Treviño ($3,500), Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, LLP ($2,500), Joe Salazar III ($1,500), Hector Chapa ($1,350) Gilbert Enriquez, Jose & Maribel Figueroa and L&G Transport Service, LLC ($1,000 each).

Candidate Sylvia Caratachea reported spending $2,806.03 on her campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 1 through June 30, Caratachea reported $2,200 in political contributions, with expenditures totalling at $1,394.53. When broken down, $394.53 were made by a credit card she opened, $1,224 was from personal funds and $1,000 were payments made from political contributions to a “business of the c/oh” [candidate].

The expenditures for this period went toward postcards, business cards, a campaign kick-off party, political signs, yard signs, t-shirts and compact size duplicate checks.

From July 1 through Oct. 1, Caratachea reported $650 in political contributions and $1,411.50 in political expenditures. She spent $712 from political contribution funds, and $699.50 from a credit card.

Expenditures for this reporting period went toward two phone banks, a drive-thru event, postcards, advertisements, flyers, a canopy to set up for early voting and candidate pushcards.

Over the course of her campaign, Caratachea’s largest contributor was former Mission Mayor and business owner Norberto “Beto” Salinas, who donated $1,000.

Place 4

Candidate Oscar Martinez reported spending $3,102.91 on his campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 1 through June 30, Martinez reported $2,500 in political contributions, with expenditures totalling at $1,994.11.

Of the contributions, $1,000 came from R.J. Garza and Co. Investments, and insurance and investments business based out of Weslaco. $1,500 were contributed by Jeffery W. Everitt and Aracely Garza, in two payments of $1,000 and $500, respectively.

The expenditures made from their contributions went toward advertising expenses and events, and included political signs, shirts, caps, and meals for their kickoff campaign event.

From July 1 through Sept. 24, Martinez reported $1,500 in political contributions and $1,108.80 in political expenditures. The expenses were reported to have gone toward a phone bank, event expenses/food, and advertisements.

Over the course of his campaign, Martinez’s largest contributors were Weslaco Insurance Brokers Jeffery Wayne Everitt and Araceli Garza ($1,500), R.J. Garza and Co. Investments and Ruth Garza ($1,000 each).

Campaign Finance Reports for candidate Roy Vela were not posted by press time. He did submit an appointment for campaign treasurer, and named Melinda Barrs in the position.

Place 5

Incumbent Candidate Charlie Garcia III reported spending $8,234.03 on his campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 20 through July 15, Garcia reported $4,950 in total political contributions and $1,995.01 in expenditures. The funds went toward campaign signs, lumber materials for signs, construction and set up of the signs, shirts and push cards.

From July 16 through Oct. 5, Garcia reported $5,681.02 in total political contributions and $6,239.02 in total political expenditures. $96.02 came from in-kind donations, and $1,636.77 were paid from Garcia’s personal funds.

$2,000 are listed to have come from the Rogelio (Roy) Vela Campaign Fund, and are categorized simply as “contributions.” The other political expenses went toward directional signs, a meet the candidate drive-thru event with tacos, marketing, “Get Out The Vote” campaigning, pumpkins, vehicle towing, meats, a photographer and DJ for a campaign event at a pumpkin patch, sand and sandbags, push cards, t-shirts, supplies, a photographer and videographer for a 2020 Dove Hunt event, and other food supplies for two additional campaign events.

Over the course of his campaign, Garcia’s largest contributors were Weslaco Insurance Broker Jeffery Wayne Everitt ($2,000), Alberto Treviño ($2,150), Linebarger Goggan Blair & Sampson, LLP ($1,500), Weslaco Insurance Brokers Jeffery Wayne Everitt and Araceli Garza ($1,000), Gilbert Enriquez and Eden Ramirez, Jr. ($1,000 each).

Candidate Romeo C. González II reported spending $2,207.06 on his campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 1 through June 30, Romeo González reported $977.91 in political contributions, with expenditures totalling at $877.91. $100 was categorized as in-kind political contributions, made for advertising on political signs.

From July 1 through Oct. 5, Romeo González reported $1,229.15 in total political contributions, with $850 gathered from donors and $379.15 from in-kind political contributions like signs and advertising.

Over the course of his campaign, Romeo González’s largest contributor was Edinburg attorney Raul Rodriguez, who donated $500.

Candidate Juan M. Gonzalez reported spending $2,331.86 on his campaign in total over 2020.

From Jan. 1 through June 30, Juan Gonzalez reported $1,414.88 in total political expenditures from his own funds. The money he spent went toward a campaign kick-off party, political signs and shirts.

From July 1 through Oct. 5, Juan Gonzalez reported a total of $500 in monetary political contributions and $916.98 in political expenditures made from those political contributions. This period, he spent money on Facebook advertisements, supplies for road signs, a phone bank and a print advertisement.

Over the course of his campaign, Juan Gonzalez’s largest contributor was Joe Salazar III, who donated $500.

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